Q&A: Hans Zimmer

Posted: November 17, 2008 in Scifi
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He is one of favorite film composers. Having watched several Ridley Scott’s film in a row recently, I love the mix of the storytelling from Ridley and the underlining music by Hans. I recently saw Black Rain with Michael Douglas. Hans score was to me back then was a cross of Tangerine Dream meets Vangelis, who is another fantastic composer and who worked with Scott – Blade Runner. 

On Black Hawk Down, I immediately heard the early stark drumbeats that I recognized from the score The Dark Knight. The piece on Dark Knight that I am referring to is called “Why So Serious?”.  Click here to hear preview on Amazon.com. Speaking The Dark Knight, I just learned about the score will not be considered for an Academy Award for best score in 2009. Go here to read more.  

As I have stated already, I truly love Hans work and have collected most of his work on cd. For me, I enjoy listening over a period of years how a composer grows and matures. For example, James Horner has done great scifi and fantasy film soundtracks for Willow, Krull, and Star Trek II to name a few. When he did the score for Field of Dreams with Kevin Costner, there was a great refinement and shift in his themes that was more softer rather than the fast paced motifs did in the early 80’s. From that moment on, he has done some majestic scores for Glory and Titanic in which he won on oscar that are simply awe inspiring. So you see, this is not the first time that I’ve heard film composer using themes over and over again in various forms but if you’re a film soundtrack, you’ll know what I’m trying to explain. 

Read below an interview I found from The Hollywood Reporter online.

Q&A: Hans Zimmer

Nov 12, 2008, 08:54 PM ET

Ryan Schude/Ryanschude.com

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You’d think after all his accomplishments Hans Zimmer would want to take it easy. You’d be wrong. In the last year alone he’s composed the music for six features: the low-budget Mexican production “Casi divas,” Warner Bros.’ summer blockbuster “The Dark Knight” (with James Newton Howard), the animated hits “Kung Fu Panda” and “Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa” for DreamWorks/Paramount, 2929 Prods.’ “The Burning Plain,” and, last but not least, Ron Howard’s ambitious holiday release “Frost/Nixon” for Universal. Despite all this, the composer took the time to sit down with The Hollywood Reporter’s Kevin Cassidy for a typically wide-ranging discussion of his life and work.

The Hollywood Reporter: You composed the scores for six films this year. Tired?

Hans Zimmer: I shouldn’t say this, but it never really feels like work. This is truly what I love doing. In this day and age, to be allowed to do what you love is extraordinary. I’m a lucky bastard.

THR: Was it difficult to transition from “Kung Fu Panda” to “The Dark Knight”?

Zimmer: It was actually not hard to get into “Kung Fu Panda.” Going from “Dark Knight” to “Madagascar 2” was tough. “Knight” was dark. So when I started “Madagascar” I was still not that … “friendly,” one could say. On “Kung Fu Panda” — what I love about this film is that it is actually quite a noble story with a lot of heart, and it’s a very good movie. The other thing: I love collaborating. It’s great to work with friends like John Powell and kick ideas around and come up with things together. I was never that emotionally insecure to the point that I didn’t like working with other people. I come from a band mentality, and film is the same sort of thing.

via Q&A: Hans Zimmer

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