Posts Tagged ‘graphic novel’


star-trek-khan-comic-book

One of the many ear worms that plague me through out the day, this ear worm for this post would be from the Disney film Frozen ‘Let It Go.” One part of the lyrics speaks to me, “Let it go, let it go, Turn away and slam the door,” and this is what I need to do but after this blog entry. I have given up trying to be pleased by a movie that never achieved the greatness that I expected from it. I am done beating a dead horse on the Kahn issue but for one last time, I had to understand where the writers where trying to go with this new Kahn.

This story beginning at the end of the movie – sort of. We see the proceedings of a trial to arraign Khan. As the trial begins, there is a Trek easter egg of a character from the original series that is very comfortable in a court setting. I’m not going to tell you who this person is as I just wanted to mention this little tidbit. Believe me, this nu-Trek has a lot to answer for but this little tip of the hat was a good ice breaker. But then we get this shocker.

kahn trial

Ok, now you have my interest. Now, you are telling me something that I wanted to know. Why is the Kahn from Into Darkness different from the Kahn from the original series Star Trek II. The next series of panels pushes the camera on the nu-Kahn to a close up and then to black. Nu-Kahn begins to tell the story through flashbacks on his rise to power and the Eugenics war. This was the hook to get me to read the rest of the stories in this graphic novel. But I was more concerned with the question at hand, “Why were there two different looking Kahn-s?” As with all good stories, you make the reader wait for it. As the story unfolds, we see Kahn and his fellow co-horts boarding the Botany Bay and leaving from Australia. Nice touch!!!

Going back to the movie Into Darkness, we are told the Admiral Marcus and nu-Kahn had met prior to the Enterprise encounter in the movie. In the graphic novel, we get a couple of scenes where a Federation ship finds the Botany Bay and brings it the secret facility. Marcus does several voice overs on the panels, “We figured out who you were soon enough, event with the scarce records of your time. We knew that waking you up as you were would be a huge mistake.” So, if Marcus came to that conclusion, don’t you think the in the original series episode, “Space Seed,” Kirk would have come to the same conclusion? Argue among yourselves and see if I am right.

However, Marcus did not heed his own warning. He decided to use Khan to his advantage and took it a step further. Marcus ordered to have most of Kahn’s memory wiped and have “laser” facial rec-Khan-struction. BLAM!!! We get not Kahn but John Harrison aka nu-Kahn. Ok…I um… ok….. no… not ok. This is a hard pill to swallow but fine; I’ll go with it.

Nu-Kahn helps out Marcus with his superior knowledge but not knowing who he truly is until he starts getting flashbacks to his earlier life on Earth. From there, things go down hill for the Admiral and then us, the audience, that had to see Into Darkness. The nu-Kahn-clusion at the end of the book is the same as what happened in the movie; nu-Kahn goes to sleep. So, I take it that at the end of the movie, nu-Khan was put to sleep and then gets awakened in the graphic novel to have a trial, to tell his story but is found guilty, and then gets back to sleep in the same chamber as before. In this context, the ending in the graphic novel fails to satisfy the reader especially since this was already done in the movie. Think of the Richard Donner’s Superman II ending that did the same thing from the first Superman movie.

However, once more, if…. and I do mean if…. this graphic novel is placed after Kirk was “resurrected” in the film and then nu-Kahn was brought to trail, did his backstory and found guilty…again, and then put to sleep in his chamber, I would have been… ok with Into Darkness as a film. At least the missing gap as to why the nu-Kahn looks nothing like the old Kahn is explained and the ending, will not perfect, will allow nu-Kahn to be resurrected in the future.

And on that note, I will, “Let it go, let it go, Turn away and slam the door.” I’m done.

 

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The news of Borders demise is not only troubling but also heartbreaking. Yes, businesses may come and businesses may go but Borders has a special place in my heart for many reasons. First off, Borders was my first real job where I rose up through the ranks to assistant manager and was with them for seven years. When the first Borders opened in Florida, I was eager to leave my crappy B.Dalton bookselling experiences behind. Borders offered something to me that allowed me to be truly happy where I was in charge of my own sections (scifi, fantasy, horror and graphic novels) and in turn, I gave the best customer service I knew how with their training of course. (Plus I met my future wife there as well.) B&N never had such focus on customer service and that’s why Borders able to set itself part from any other book store chain.

Back in 1993, Borders had only reached 47 stores nationwide. Having said this, I had the number one sales in graphic novels nationwide. With the sales on my side, I pushed to get an account opened up with Diamond Distributors to increase our collection and get the massive discounts for the staff on our favorite books and such. During the height of the Death of Superman, graphic novels were becoming increasing popular and for comic collectors like me who stopped collecting, this was a great way to catch up on many great storylines without having to buy the single issue floppies.

As with any relationship, I grew out of favor with Borders because of the glass ceiling I kept hitting. Don’t think for one moment that I am enjoying the demise of Borders; I don’t. I hated the culture of Borders had changed. The customer service experience that I was trained on where you walk to the section with the customer, take the book off the shelf and place it in customer’s hands is gone. (I do however still do this my with patrons at the library.) No longer were the stores given the time to do this when sales were the only thing that mattered. in hindsight, this is where Borders shot itself in the foot because the customer service experience is what drove sales. Our customers could have paid less for the same material over at B&N but they would not have the same shopping experience that will bring them back again and again. Carry this one step further, based on the amount of sales, the stores were allotted x amount of employees; with less sales fewer employees. Over time, staff size has gotten so bad to the point where a simple customer service desk could not be manned. The sign that said, “Customer Service Desk” should have added,”You Should Have Been Here When There Was Staff 10 Years Ago Customer Service Desk.” When these desks were abandoned and Borders decided to turned their computers to face the customer and that’s when I knew Borders was gone. When I read over the holidays the troubles Borders is going through, Borders was an empty rotting husk. I need to do a Klingon death scream for my old Borders, my old section and my favorite graphic novel section. “RRRRRRRRRRRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!”

Submitted by Rich Johnston on January 12, 2011 – 5:43 pm (0) comments

Today, Diamond Book Distributors informed publishers that, as of last week, they had stopped supplying graphic novels/collections to the Borders bookstore chain.

They confirmed that this was as result of Borders suspending payments to suppliers, and this included Diamond.

I cannot emphasise the seriousness of this situation enough. Most comics publishers use Diamond Book Distribution, at least in part, to distribute collections or original graphic novels into bookstores. Borders are a very large national chain and right now, hold, or have sold, millions upon millions of dollars of just comic book publisher’s stock, unpaid for, sale or return.

via Diamond Halts All Shipments Of Graphic Novels To Borders. Apocalyptic Wave Of Returns Expected Bleeding Cool Comic Book, Movies and TV News and Rumors.


 

 

The Walking Dead Vol.1 Days Gone By

By Robert Kirkman; Illustrations by Tony Moore

In this black and white graphic novel, Rick Grimes is a small town police officer from Kentucky who wakes up from a coma from a gun fire fight. The hospital is eerily quiet with no one around except for zombies. Escaping this living horror in the hospital and with the help of a couple of survivors, Rick heads to Atlanta to find his wife and child. For those who love zombies this is an excellent series to pick up. There is enough action and gore to satisfy the even more hardcore zombie fans. However, you will be more intrigued and terrified more by survivors and not in just this book but the entire series.

As a heads up, this series will be coming to cable this fall on AMC. The pic below is Andrew Lincoln as Officer Rick Grimes.

If you have not read the first book, now is the chance to see AMC’s motion comic of The Walking Dead.


whiteout posterFor all those Kate Beckinsale fans out there, especially me, there will be a new movie for her called Whiteout. This is another graphic novel adaptation which comes out on September 11, 2009; two weeks prior to the release of The Surrogates with Bruce Willis. While this movie has no scifi elements in the story, we do have Kate from Van Helsing and the Underworld movies as a scifi tie-in. More importantly, we have seen past movies where outposts in the most parts of the world are used as the setting for many stories.

One of my favorites would be John Carpenter’s The Thing which takes place in Antarctica. An alien shapesifter crash lands on Earth and takes the place of the people it kills. There is yet another graphic novel adaptation called 30 Days of Night by Steve Niles which takes place in Barrow, Alaska (Which you can see Russia from your house… if you lived there. You betcha’.) The residents migrate out of town when the town will be black for 30 days which makes perfect sense for vampires to stalk their prey. Click here to read my review of the graphic novel. Smillia’s Sense of Snow with Julia Ormond as a transplanted Greenlander living in Copenhagen. She using her sense of snow to uncover an accidental death of a child, she stumbles upon clues about a secretive corporation that has made several mysterious expeditions to Greenland.

Greg Rucka the writer of the Whiteout is also wrote of the segments of the Batman Gotham Knight direct to DVD called Crossfire. While the DVD is good, the Crossfire storyline was absolutely fantastic. I have not read this book but I am curious to read it especially now. Below is a page from Whiteout which you can read online.

page 1

If you like to continue reading this story from Whiteout, click here. But before you go, checkout the trailer from the movie and let me know what you think.

Vodpod videos no longer available.


st countdown coverIf you have heard the two Star Trek podcasts, (if you haven’t here are the links to my Star Trek podcasts Part 1 http://bit.ly/Lk1Di Part 2 http://tinyurl.com/o2zo9r) there was a brief mention about the main baddie Nero. While we all had the agreement that Nero was better than several past villains, I still wanted to know what drove Nero to where we met him in the movie. This graphic novel Star Trek Countdown is supposed to fill in that gap and sadly… I’m still not happy.

Word of warning before I go any further SPOILERS AHEAD. We see Nero working with his mining crew. They are the first to witness the star eruption in the Hobus System. We jump ahead to see Ambassador Spock is speaking to the Romulan Senate about this impending doom. Nero attends the same hearing and offers first hand reporting to back up Spock’s claim. While the Senate dismisses the claims, I’m struck by the thought, “Hey, I read this already when it was called the destruction of Krypton.” Remember how the Jor-El tried to warn others how Krypton was on the verge of destruction; well, that was great but this was Countdown story was really pissing me off.  

Nero and Spock join forces and race off to find Decalithium to convert it to the “Red Matter”. Nero leaves behind his wife who is carrying their unborn child.  We understand Nero’s motivation to save his homeworld against Senate but there with such a looming threat one would have thought he would have brought his wife and those his crew cared for as a matter of safety. Along the way, his ship comes under attack by the Remans. Aw, geez you have got to be frakinn’ kidding me. For those who love Star Trek Nemesis you might be overjoyed by this but since I hated that freakin’ movie; WHY?!? This malnourished vampire Romulan cousins attack for no known reason and luckily for Nero, Spock and friends, we get not only a Federation ship to come to their aid but it’s the Enterprise and captained by Data. WTF?!?

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